Grandma Nogueira’s Devil Dump Cake

A couple of years ago I purchased a book online. It was a sort of scrap book called Our Familia Cookbook and Customs by Alvera Leal. It came from California. The book is handmade full of recipes with some info about the Azores and the Leal, Homen and Nogueira family. Someone must have pitched it, but their loss was my gain. It is clearly made by a mother or grandmother for her children. The other day my daughter pulled it off the shelf and brought it to me. I thought it might be interesting to share some of Mrs Leal’s recipes here. I’ve never tried it myself as I don’t eat eggs. If you make the recipe please send me a photo of you and your family enjoying it to bdapooh@hotmail.com . Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Page under “Portuguese Bermudian History” .

Grandma Nogueira’s Dump Devil Cake
1 cup of sour or sweet milk
1/2 cup of chocolate
1 1/2 cups of flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 cup of sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup of oil
1 tsp soda
1 tsp salt

Mix all together and beat well. Bake in greased pan in 350F oven until done.

The filling includes one small can of chopped pineapple, add a little water, 4 tbsp of sugar, 1 tbsp of butter, 1 tbsp of cornstarch. Mix all together and spread on cool cake.

You don’t need to go back to Portugal.

Many newcomers to genealogy often assume they have to go back to the old country to access vital records. Actually, this isn’t necessarily so. In case you didn’t know the Church of the Latter Day Saints (LDS) are trying to baptise your dead ancestors. Maybe you object to people messing with the souls of your long dead dearly departed. Quite frankly my grandparents kept to their opinions in life, and I can’t imagine them caving now that they are dead. Anyway, the good news is that in order to baptise your ancestors, the LDS have to know who they were and where they lived. They do this by travelling around the world transcribing parish records. In their attempts to convert the dead they have created a very very useful genealogy tool. Warning though, it’s not always 100 percent accurate. They have a FREE online website with searchable databases at http://www.familysearch.org . They have also created family history centres around the world that contain family history data including microfiche versions of parish records. Although it’s nice to go back to the old country, to get to Parish records from the Azores you can go to the LDS family history centre in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. The majority of their records are from Sao Miguel and some from Madeira. When I was living in Boston my husband and I took a trip down there. My aunt has family living nearby. In Boston the streets are always cleared and salted. I went in sneakers in the middle of winter and that was an experience. I forgot my winter boots in Boston. The centre was a little building with a sheet of ice in front of it. Once we slid our way across, it was warm and cozy inside. There were a few regulars there to help. Now let me tell you the bad news. The records are in Portuguese script. They are very difficult to wade through if you don’t know exactly what you are looking for. Even if you know Portuguese if you are looking at the 1880s the handwriting is quite different. So be warned that you may not come out knowing anything more than you did when you went in. You might want to stay in the neighbourhood a few days and keep plugging away at it. Their telephone number is: 508-994-8215 , according to the family history centre website. The atmosphere is very friendly and no body tried to convert us or preach or anything.